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Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s New York ‘Reproductive Health Act’ enshrines abortion extremism

As Americans mark the 46th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s tragic Roe v. Wade decision, the fundamentalist decision which imposed abortion-on-demand and without restriction as the law of the land, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has opted to sign legislation making New York perhaps the most life-hostile state in the nation. In signing the so-called “New York Reproductive Health Act,” Governor Cuomo strips away all patient protections from vulnerable women and children and ignores the state’s interest in maintaining Supreme Court-approved health and safety regulations.

“New York’s profoundly corrosive legislation is extreme,” stated Catherine Glenn Foster, President & CEO of Americans United for Life. “New York now permits non-physicians to perform abortions and de facto permits infanticide of the sort that notorious Philadelphia abortionist Kermit Gosnell was convicted only recently.”

“Planned Parenthood and other leading abortion advocates have for years claimed that abortion is ‘healthcare,’” reflects Steven H. Aden, Chief Legal Officer & General Counsel of Americans United for Life. “Why then are alleged advocates of healthcare reducing the standard of care for women by replacing physicians with lower level technicians and allowing optional surgical procedures to be conducted without state regulatory oversight? And why does New York’s new law allow abortion for any reason through all nine months—when medical studies show that after 20 weeks gestation, abortion is considerably more dangerous for the mother than carrying the baby to term?”

Gov. Andrew Cuomo turns the traditional Democratic mentality of abortion being “safe, legal, and rare” on its head, instead imposing an extremist, anti-scientific ideology advocating abortion as a default response to pregnancy anytime, anywhere, for any reason, and by anyone.

Abortion, a major surgical event, is now less regulated in New York than almost any medical procedure and is arguably less regulated than any New York City restaurant.