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AUL in the News, 1/6/2011

From Healthwatch, the healthcare blog for The Hill:

Anti-abortion groups are gearing up to the ensure that Rep. John Boehner (R-Ohio) lives up to his campaign promise to be the most pro-life Speaker in history.

[…]

The No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act, introduced in July by Reps. Chris Smith (R-N.J.) and Dan Lipinski (D-Ill.), would create a government-wide statutory prohibition on taxpayer funding of abortion. Abortion opponents say the legislation is needed to ensure the healthcare reform law can’t cover the cost of abortions.

[…]

Americans United for Life President and CEO Charmaine Yoest is attending Boehner’s swearing in.

“I predict that we will see changes in President Obama’s pro-abortion health care plan and in other pro-life measures as a result of pro-life leadership taking their places in Washington, D.C. today,” Yoest said in a statement.

In addition to its federal lobbying, AUL has drafted 38 model bills for state legislators to adopt. They focus on abortion, protection of the unborn, bioethics, end of life issues and rights of conscience for healthcare providers.

From OneNewsNow:

“We’re very excited about the opportunities we see opening up in front of the life movement, because with the change in the United States Congress and seeing pro-life leadership come back to the House side, there are now opportunities to defend life that we have not seen in a very long time,” notes Charmaine Yoest, CEO and president of Americans United for Life (AUL).

She says one of her group’s major goals is to repeal healthcare reform, so AUL will be working to make that happen, especially when it comes to gaining passage in the Senate.

“It is doable because the polling data is really clear that the United States Congress really overreached and President Obama did not have the support that he thought that he did for passing this really, really big piece of legislation that included so much subsidies and a change in federal policy towards abortion,” Yoest contends.

She is confident passage will take place in the House, but she expects the task to be more difficult in the Senate. If accomplished, the repeal bill will go to the president. And if he vetoes it, Yoest believes that will create another campaign issue for 2012.